Article 1 of the 4th Geneva Convention

Dimitri Lascaris delivered the closing talk in the Israel, Palestine & International Law symposium, focusing on Canada’s obligations under Article 1 of the 4th Geneva Convention (1949).

Lascaris is a Canadian lawyer, journalist and activist. In 2012, he was named by Canadian Lawyer Magazine as one of Canada’s 25 most influential lawyers. He is a correspondent and board member of The Real News Network and a board member of Canadians for Justice and Peace in the Middle East. Dimitri ran for the Green Party of Canada in Canada’s 2015 Federal elections, in the riding of London West. Subsequently, he served as justice critic on the GPC’s shadow cabinet.

Here’s the full text of Dimitri’s talk. Listen to and watch Dimitri deliver his presentation here:

Faceoff

Arguably the most debated and awaited session of our Israel, Palestine & International Law symposium: the Sunday, 9 a.m. presentation by pro-Israel lawyer David Matas (B’Nai Brith Canada’s senior legal counsel), followed by a response from UN Special Rapporteur for human rights in the occupied Palestinian Territories, Michael Lynk.

The concept was that Matas would deliver an ~40-min. talk, followed by a ten-minute response by Lynk and then questions for Matas from the floor. But events transpired otherwise. David Matas and Michael Lynk ended up sitting side by side, fielding questions from a highly passionate but polite and welcoming roomful of Winnipeggers — and a few outsiders.

Read the full text of David Matas’ presentation, listen to and watch Michael Lynk’s response, then his Q&A with David Matas at the links below:

 

Saturday Evening With Virginia Tilley

On the Saturday evening of our September 7-9 Israel, Palestine & International Law symposium, political scientist Virginia Tilley unpacked and inspected the Israeli Apartheid question.

Virginia Tilley is Professor of Political Science at Southern Illinois University. She co-authored Israeli Practices towards the Palestinian People and the Question of Apartheid, together with Richard Falk (UN Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia, 2017). From 2006 to 2011, Tilley served as Chief Research Specialist in the Human Sciences Research Council of South Africa. She is the author of The One-State Solution (University of Michigan Press) and editor of Beyond Occupation: Apartheid, Colonialism and International Law in the Occupied Palestinian Territories (Pluto Press, 2012).

Read the full text of Virginia Tilley’s presentation. Listen to and watch her here:

 

Pillage & Usufruct

No happier moment at the Israel, Palestine & International Law symposium, after weeks of visa struggle, than spotting Suha Jarrar strolling into the Assiniboine Room of Winnipeg’s classy Hotel Fort Garry. The saga of Suha’s visit to Canada may one day be told. For now, read her presentation and check out the video below.

Suha Jarrar is a Palestinian human rights researcher and advocate, and currently the Environmental and Gender Policy Researcher at Al-Haq human rights organization in Ramallah, Palestine. She obtained her Bachelor of Arts degree in environmental and gender studies from Trent University in Canada, and her Master of Science in Climate Change Science and Policy from the University of Sussex. Suha’s M.Sc. research focused on climate change adaptation in the Occupied Palestinian Territories.

Settlements, the Wall & the ‘Great March of Return’

Michael Lynk (UN Special Rapporteur on the occupied Palestinian territories) opened up this mid-Saturday afternoon session of the Israel, Palestine & International Law symposium with a presentation entitled Israel’s Settlements & Wall — What does the law say? Read his presentation here.

Lawyer-activist Dimitri Lascaris followed Michael with an analysis of Israel’s obligations respecting Gaza protestors in the Great March of Return. Click here to read Dimitri’s presentation.

Listen to and watch Michael and Dimitri’s presentations here:

… and Palestine’s Obligations to Its Own People

Right after lunch on Saturday, Sept. 8, at Winnipeg’s classy Hotel Fort Garry, the Israel, Palestine & International Law symposium hooked up by Skype with Jonathan Kuttab. The goddess of technology had our back. The link worked perfectly — as the video below shows.

Jonathan is a human rights lawyer in Israel and Palestine. Having received his Doctor of Jurisprudence  (J.D.) at Virginia Law School, in 1979, he went on to co-found Al-Haq, Palestine’s first human rights/international law organization, the Mandela Institute for Political Prisoners, and the Palestinian Center for Study of Non-Violence (now Non-Violence International). Jonathan was a member of the legal team that negotiated the 1994 Cairo Agreement on the Gaza Strip and Jericho — the Oslo II Accord.

Joining Jonathan on Saturday afternoon — also from Al-Haq — was Suha Jarrar. Suha is Al-Haq’s Environmental and Gender Policy Researcher. She earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in environmental and gender studies from Trent University in Canada, and her Master of Science in Climate Change Science and Policy from the University of Sussex. Suha’s M.Sc. research focused on climate change adaptation in the Occupied Palestinian Territories.

Listen to and watch Jonathan Kuttab and Suha Jarrar at this video link:

 

 

Vast Disparity Between Rhetoric & Reality

Dimitri Lascaris is a Canadian lawyer, journalist and activist. In 2012, Dimitri was named by Canadian Lawyer Magazine as one of Canada’s 25 most influential lawyers. He is a correspondent and board member of The Real News Network and a board member of Canadians for Justice and Peace in the Middle East.

Dimitri spoke to the Israel, Palestine & International Law symposium about the vast disparity between what Western governments say and do about international human rights. Here’s a link to the text of his talk.

Click on the SoundCloud link below — and the YouTube video on the bottom:

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Michael Lynk & Virginia Tilley

Saturday morning, bright and early, at the Israel, Palestine & International Law symposium, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada — Sept. 8, 2018 — Michael Lynk delivered a concise legal survey on international humanitarian & human rights law (‘So, What Are These Laws? Nuts & Bolts’) and Virginia Tilley countered with a sharp political critique (‘One State or Two? Reconciling Occupation & Apartheid with International Humanitarian & Human Rights Law’). A stellar pair-up.

Click on the SoundCloud link here — and then on the YouTube link below:

 

Keynote Presentation by Michael Lynk

The Israel, Palestine & International Law symposium kicked off on the evening of Friday, Sept. 7, at the classic Hotel Fort Garry, just up from the Winnipeg Forks, with a keynote presentation by Canadian law professor Michael Lynk. Lynk is an Associate Professor of Law at Western University and — since 2016 — UN Special Rapporteur for the situation of human rights in the Palestinian territories occupied since 1967.

Click on the SoundCloud link to hear Michael’s keynote — and the one beneath it for Q&A. Complete video is at the bottom.

 

 

 

Moot Law

By Dimitri Lascaris

My first foray into international law occurred thirty years ago. As a second-year law student at the University of Toronto, I wanted to secure a place on one of the law school’s moot teams (simulated court proceeding). At that time, the University of Toronto law school participated in four moot competitions, but only one of them presented an opportunity to moot against non-Canadian law schools: that competition was the Phillip C. Jessup International Law Moot.

In the ensuing try-outs, I performed well enough to secure a spot on the Jessup team.

Dimitri Lascaris

Our Jessup moot team’s first task was to prepare and submit to the competition’s organizers a legal brief. The brief would be evaluated by lawyers having expertise in international law. It would form the basis of the oral submissions we would make throughout the various phases of the competition.

The essential facts of our imaginary dispute were as follows:

A cargo vessel bearing the flag of State A transported hazardous substances through international waters off the coast of Antarctica. There, it released some of those substances into the ocean. Unbeknownst to the crew of the vessel, within those waters resided an extremely rare species of fish. That species could be found nowhere else on earth. Shortly following the ship’s release of hazardous substances into the ocean, the entire species was wiped out.

State B then brought a claim against State A before the International Court of Justice. State B had no territorial claim over the waters in question and no interest in the destroyed species that was different from the interest of any other state in that species. I was assigned to act for the complainant, State B.

For the next six months, the Jessup moot competition consumed me and my three team-mates. We succeeded in winning the Canadian championship and advanced to the international finals in Washington, D.C., where we represented Canada. Law schools from over 40 countries participated in the international phase of the competition.

By the time we arrived in Washington, I had fallen in love with international law. Yet, the more that I came to understand the architecture of international relations, the more I came to understand that international law is not ‘law’ in the conventional sense. The reason, quite simply, is that there was (and remains) no effective mechanism for the enforcement of international law.

Israel’s decades-long impunity vis-a-vis international law is a powerful demonstration of this reality. The United Nations General Assembly and Security Council have adopted hundreds of resolutions relating to Israel and Palestine. Many of those resolutions contain stinging rebukes of Israel’s treatment of the Palestinian people.

Moreover, in 2004, the International Court of Justice unanimously ruled — with the concurrence of an American jurist — that Israel’s settlements violate the Fourth Geneva Convention. In the international community, there is near unanimity on that point, and has been for decades.

Even Theodor Meron has so opined. Mr. Meron is an international jurist who was legal adviser to Israel’s Foreign Ministry when Israel began to build settlements in the West Bank shortly after the 1967 war. Last year, Professor Meron publicly confirmed the opinion he secretly rendered to Israel’s Foreign Ministry in the late 1960s and meticulously dismantled the arguments Israel has advanced since then in support of its claim that its settlements do not violate international law.

And yet, despite the broad and long-standing consensus on the illegality of Israel’s settlements, those settlements are more extensive today than ever. The core reason for this injustice, in my view, is the structure of the United Nations.

Five states hold permanent seats on the United Nations Security Council, which has the power, under Chapter VII of the United Nation’s Charter, to impose sanctions or take military action to counter threats to peace, breaches of the peace and acts of aggression. Each of the permanent members enjoys a veto right that cannot be overcome by super-majority voting.

Three of those permanent members — the United States, Britain and France — are staunchly committed to defending Israel’s apartheid regime, however human rights-oriented their rhetoric may be. Indeed, the United States has used its veto power over forty times to prevent the Security Council from censuring Israel.

Wall between Israel and Palestinian town of Qalqilya (David Kattenburg)

Despite the Security Council’s abject failure to protect Palestinian rights under international law, Israel’s apologists claim that the United Nations is biased against Israel. UN Watch, a staunchly pro-Israel website which holds itself out as a watchdog of the United Nations, routinely points to the many resolutions condemning Israel adopted by wide margins at the General Assembly and the UN Security Council. UN Watch also criticizes the United Nations for allowing egregious human rights violators like Saudi Arabia to occupy positions of influence in UN bodies that are mandated to advance the cause of human rights.

UN Watch routinely ignores, however, that the United Nations has never backed up its many condemnations of Israeli aggression with meaningful sanctions. Under the circumstances, UN Watch’s complaints of anti-Israel bias are, at best, specious.

When it comes to the enforcement of international humanitarian law, there is no greater impediment than the veto rights of the most powerful states. Until we address that structural flaw in the United Nations Charter, the United Nation’s pronouncements will have little more effect on Israel than the judgment of a moot court.

Dimitri Lascaris is a Canadian lawyer, journalist and activist. He is a correspondent and board member of The Real News Network and a board member of Canadians for Justice and Peace in the Middle East. Dimitri will be a panelist in two sessions of the Israel, Palestine & International Law Symposium: ‘Israel’s Rights & Obligations Under International Law’ (together with Michael Lynk), and ‘Canada’s Obligations Under the UN Charter and International Law’.